PROJECT:
LOUISIANA BLACK BEAR

MISSION

Maintain at least two viable sub-populations with an immigration and emigration corridor between the sub-populations.

ABOUT THE LOUISIANA BLACK BEAR

Louisiana’s official state mammal, the Louisiana black bear is also the state’s most recent conservation success story. One of 16 unique subspecies of the American black bear in North America, the Louisiana black bear was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1992. Years of overexploitation from bear hunting in the 19th and early 20th centuries and widespread deforestation from manufacturing of wood products and clearing lands for agriculture drastically reduced the population and distribution of Louisiana black bear. Thanks to the collaborative efforts of multiple stakeholders to monitor black bear population numbers, restore black bear habitat, and protect the subspecies for the long term, the Louisiana black bear has now recovered and was removed from the list in 2016. (Source: LDWF)

Louisiana Black Bear Range
Louisiana Black Bear and Cub
Louisiana Black Bear Release

Efforts to restock have been successful by trapping live bears and relocating them other regions.

Louisiana Black Bears are an essential part of the forest ecosystems as seed dispersers and nutrient providers.

Berry seeds pass through the bear unbroken and are able to germinate. As an important link in the food web, bears help maintain populations of deer and other prey species through predation.

However, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has issued advisories to take precautions to limit encounters with bears since they have made  in incredible comeback.

On September 30, 2020, several groups filed a lawsuit to return the Louisiana Black Bear to the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife disputing the claims that the bears have recovered their populations.

Louisiana Black Bear Cubs

WHAT IS AT RISK?

If the Louisiana Black Bear is added back on the Endangered Species List, millions of acres will be withdrawn from recreational, hunting, and oil and gas development. 

ACTIVITIES TO ADDRESS THE RISK

The Recovery Plan has three requirements for de-listing of the Louisiana Black Bear:

  1. At least two viable sub-populations (viable means 95% chance of persistence over 100 years)
  2. Immigration and emigration corridors between the two viable sub-populations to ensure genetic diversity
  3. Long-term protection of the habitat and the interconnecting corridors

PROTECT TODAY’S PRECIOUS RESOURCES FOR TOMORROW’S GENERATION TO ENJOY.